SBL Annual Meetings’ Philo Seminar Papers

Papers for

SBL’s Annual Meetings Philo Seminars

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SBL Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, Nov. 23-26. 2019

(For the 2013 – 2018 Philo papers, see  further below.)

To open the files on an Ipad, hold a finger on the link and choose ‘open in a new tab’ etc from the menu that pops up.
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Philo of Alexandria Sunday, Nov. 24. 2019 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: Sapphire 400B (Fourth Level) – Hilton Bayfront

ThemePhilo’s «On the Embassy to Gaius»
Justin Rogers, Freed-Hardeman University, Presiding

Click on the title of the paper to open it (not all papers are in yet).

(Abstracts are taken from the SBL SIte)

Sandra Gambetti, College of Staten Island (CUNY)
It Is All in a γάρ; Philo’s Introduction to Legatio ad Gaium (25 min) Click on title to open!

Abstract: According to the author, the file above is an extended abstract

Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton
Alexandria and Legatio (25 min

Abstract: Not given

Break (10 min)

Allen Kerkeslager, Saint Joseph’s University (Philadelphia, PA)
Stages in the Funerary Rituals for Caligula’s Sister Drusilla in Alexandria in 38CE (25 min)

Abstract: A series of studies have argued that the attacks on the Judean community in Alexandria in 38 CE erupted during the city’s funerary ceremonies for Caligula’s sister Drusilla. The Alexandrian rituals were concentrated in a iustitium. This was a highly restrictive state of public emergency that symbolized the central role of the imperial household in the security of Rome. Drusilla had died in Rome on June 10. The iustitium for Drusilla in Alexandria probably lasted for nine days beginning in the first couple weeks of July. In this view, the Alexandrian crowds tried to install images of Drusilla and other members of the imperial household in the city’s synagogues during the initial phase of her iustitium. The city’s Judeans violently resisted. In doing so they treasonously violated the imperial family and the «glory» (maiestas) of Rome. Troops commanded by the Roman prefect Flaccus quickly restored order. After the iustitium ended, Flaccus issued an edict announcing the punishment for the Judean crimes. The subsequent violence was the official implementation of his edict. It was orchestrated by Flaccus in his role as agent of the Roman order. This paper adds cogency to this hypothesis by reconstructing what is likely to have occurred at each stage in the short sequence of events from Drusilla’s death in Rome to the funerary oration of Flaccus in the theater, which probably occurred at the very beginning of the iustitium in Alexandria. It was this speech that most likely set in motion the subsequent tragedy by inciting the initial effort of the crowds to install images of the imperial family in the synagogues of Alexandria. Most of the focus will be on the rituals of the iustitium itself as they were implemented in the Alexandrian context. The overwhelming significance, scale, and dynamics these rituals leave no doubt about whether the mourning rituals for Drusilla played a decisive role in the start of the violence. If anything, combined with previous studies, the evidence assembled in this paper should make one wonder how they could not have played such a role.

René Bloch, Universität Bern – Université de Berne
Dionysus, “Inventor of New Blessings” (Legat. 88): Philo’s Use of Greek Religion in his Embassy to Gaius (25 min)

Abstract: Not given

Discussion (25 min)

Business Meeting (15 min)

 

 


S26-127 Philo of Alexandria Tuesday, Nov. 26  2019
9:00 AM to 11:15 AM
Room: 32B (Upper Level East) – Convention Center

Theme: Editions of Philo in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Presiding

Gregory Sterling, Yale Divinity School
Thomas Mangey and the Arrangement of the Philonic Corpus (25 min)

Abstract: In my estimation there have been four major turning points in the modern history of Philo’s text: the edito princeps of Adrianus Turnebus (1552), the edition of Thomas Mangey in two volumes (1742), the influential edition of C. E. Richter in eight volumes (1828-1830), and the editio major of Leopold Cohn and Paul Wendland in six volumes (1896-1915). This paper will examine the edition of Mangey by looking at his life and the edition that he produced. The paper will attempt to situate Mangey within eighteenth-century British scholarship and provide a critical evaluation of his contributions. In particular, we will focus on the advances that he made over Turnebus and the editions that followed, especially with respect to the arrangement of the Philonic corpus.

Michael Cover, Marquette University
Karl Ernst Richter’s Schwickert Edition: The Art (and Science) of Introducing Philo; Or, How Not to Analyze a Philonic Treatise (25 min)  Click on title to open!

Abstract: Karl Ernst Richter’s Philonis Judaei opera omnia (Leipzig, 1828–1830) represents something of a minor stepping stone between the monumental achievement of Thomas Mangey’s 1742 edition and the modern critical edition of Cohn and Wendland (1896–1915). It makes a number of advances on the Pfeiffer edition (1785–1792), given Richter’s ability to draw on the recent editorial work of Angelo Mai (1818) and Johannes B. Aucher (1826). Chief among these is the inclusion of two new subtreatises from the second book of De specialibus legibus: De coiphini festo, or On the Feast of the Basket (Spec. 2.215–223), an appendix to Philo’s treatment of the fourth commandment; and De parentibus colendis (Spec. 2.224–262), the treatment of the fifth commandment and a codicil on the death penalty. Richter set an important precedent for Philonic scholarship by including Aucher’s Latin translations from the Paralipomena Armena, insinuating that Philo’s Greek and Armenian works belonged together—a pattern followed in subsequent Philonic editions (PAPM, PLCL). Richter also included a Greek index and a Sachindex. But perhaps the most important—and also the most problematic—contribution of Richter’s edition is his analysis of Philo’s treatises into paragraphs (“textum in paragraphos distinximus”), labeled with Roman numbers. Each paragraph is keyed to a (ca.) one-sentence summary, which are cumulatively presented at the beginning of each treatise as argumenta. (“summaria singulis libris praeposuimus”). Richter’s work in this regard is noteworthy, as his summaria represent the first “analytic introductions” to individual Philonic treatises—a practice imitated to very good effect by Colson in the PLCL. Yet Richter’s analysis of the text into divisions—maintained by both the Loeb and Cohn Wendland editions as roman numerals—while groundbreaking for their time, are seriously wanting by modern standards, as they fail to comprehend the essentially lemmatic and exegetical character of Philo’s major commentary series. After surveying in more detail some of the contributions listed above, this paper will primarily chart and unearth Richter’s analytic principals and consider what, if anything, of enduring value remain in the Richter paragraph divisions.

Break (10 min)

Abraham Terian, St. Nersess Armenian Sem.
Aucher’s 1822 and 1826 Editions of Philonis Opera in Armenia: History of an Exceptional Text (25 min)

Abstract: With his two editions of the Armenian text of Philo the Greek of which is no longer extant except for occasional fragments, and with his Latin translation, Aucher made the Armenian corpus of Philo accessible to Western scholarship (Armenian medieval scholarship on Philo has a history of its own, without awareness of either the loss of the Greek original of nearly half of what is extant of Philo in Armenian or the rest of Philo extant in Greek). In the first volume he had the works commonly referred to as “Dialogues” between Philo and his apostate nephew Tiberius Julius Alexander, and in the second those of the fragmentary yet substantial Quaestiones, the pseudo-Philonic De Sampsone and De Jona, and the authentically Philonic fragment on Abraham and the Three Angels, called De Deo. The paper underscores the viability of Aucher’s text, the history of the underlying manuscript, and concludes with renewed appreciation of his Philonic work and the rest of his little known yet outstanding scholarship.

James Royse, Claremont, CA
The Edition of Cohn-Wendland (25 min)

Abstract: This paper will examine some features of what is now the standard critical edition of the Greek works of Philo. This edition, edited by Leopold Cohn and Paul Wendland (and Siegfried Reiter for the latter part of vol. 6), appeared in six volumes from 1896 to 1915. The high quality of the editorial work and of the resulting text have made these volumes an enduring monument of Philonic scholarship. Among the topics to be considered in some detail are (1) the manuscript basis of the edition, (2) the use of the Armenian and Latin versions, (3) the decisions concerning Philo’s biblical citations, and (4) the use of conjectural emendation.

 

Discussion (25 min)

 


 

SBL Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado, Nov. 17-20. 2018

S18-339  Philo of Alexandria
11/18/2018 4:00 PM to 6:45 PM
Room: Mile High Ballroom 4D (Lower Level) – Convention Center (CC)

ThemeStudies on Philo of Alexandria
Ronald Cox, Pepperdine University, Presiding

Courtney Friesen, University of Arizona
Philo of Alexandria and the Masks of Heracles (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

Tyler A. Stewart, Lincoln Christian University
The Origin of Evil and Subordinate Creators: Philo’s Exegesis of Gen 1:26 in Context (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript (Rev.ed.)

NOT able to attend:Luiz Felipe Ribeiro, University of Toronto
Pederast Playthings and Androgynous Souls: Philo Judaeus’ Polemic against Socratic Pedagogic Pederasty in the Symposium (Vit. Cont. 57–64) (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                  

Break (10 min) + extra discussion time!

Richard A Zaleski, University of Chicago
Philo’s Double Paraphrase of the Parting of the Red Sea in Mos. 1.175–79 and 2.250–55 (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript. Click here for HANDOUT.

John Sehorn, Augustine Institute
Philo and Origen on Moses as Prophet (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

Discussion (30 min)

 

S19-329 Philo of Alexandria
11/19/2018 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Mile High Ballroom 4F (Lower Level) – Convention Center (CC)

Theme: Philo’s «On the Sacrifices of Cain and Abel»
Ronald Cox, Presiding

Justin Rogers, Freed-Hardeman University
Commentary on the Sacrifices of Cain and Abel (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

James Royse, Claremont, CA
New and Neglected Readings from De sacrificiis and Other Works of Philo (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

Break (10 min)

Scott Mackie, Independent Scholar
“God Has Had Mercy on Me”: Theology and Soteriology in De sacrificiis Abelis et Caini (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

Ron Cox, Pepperdine University
Philo’s Allegorical Interpretation of Sacrifice in «On the Sacrifices of Cain and Abel» (25 min)

Click here for Abstract                                                                                   Click here for manuscript

Discussion (25 min)
Business Meeting (15 min)

 

 

 

 


SBL Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, Nov. 18-21, 2017.

(For the 2013 – 2016 Philo papers, see  further below.)

 


S19-138: Philo of Alexandria
11/19/2017  9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Room: 103 (Plaza Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)

Theme: Philo’s De Cherubim
Ronald Cox, Pepperdine University, Presiding

Annewies van den Hoek, Harvard University:
Philo’s De Cherubim: Sample Commentary and Translation (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for 1-Introduction2-Text Cherub 1-10 3-Commentary

 

Michael Cover, Marquette University:
The Logic and Poetics of Association: Secondary and Tertiary Lemmas in Philo’s De Cherubim (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

James Royse, Claremont:
The Text of Philo’s De Cherubim (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Discussion (25 min)
Break (10 min)

Sean Adams, University of Glasgow:
To Be and Not to Be: Philo on the Difference between Philosophers and Sophists (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

 

Justin Rogers, Freed-Hardeman University:
A Little Cain in All of Us: De Cherubim as an Introduction to Philo’s ‘Cain Trilogy’ (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Discussion (20 min).
Business Meeting (10 min).

 

S19 – 333   Philo of Alexandria
11/19/2017 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Tremont (First Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)

(No papers will be available here)

Theme: Panel Review of Maren Niehoff’s Philo of Alexandria: An Intellectual Biography (Yale University Press)

Ellen Birnbaum, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Presiding (5 min)
Erich Gruen, University of California-Berkeley, Panelist (15 min)
Gregory Sterling, Yale Divinity School, Panelist (15 min)
René Bloch, Universität Bern – Université de Berne, Panelist (15 min)
Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Panelist (15 min)
Thomas Tobin, Loyola University of Chicago, Panelist (15 min)
Break (10 min)
Maren Niehoff, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Respondent (20 min)
Discussion (40 min)

 

 

 



 

SBL Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, Nov. 17-22, 2016.


s20-220 Philo of Alexandria
11/20/2016 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: 217C (2nd Level – West) – Convention Center (CC)

Theme: The Knowledge of God in Philo of Alexandria

Sean Adams, University of Glasgow, Presiding

Mark Hamilton, Abilene Christian University
Divine (Dis)embodiment as an aspect of Divine Otherness in Philo (30 min). 

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Ilaria L.E. Ramelli, Catholic University+Angelicum +Oxford University
The Knowledge of God and the Dialectics of Apophatic Theology: Philo between Scripture and the Platonic Tradition (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Break (10 min)

Sharon Weisser, Tel Aviv University
Knowing God by Analogy: Philo of Alexandria’s Proofs for the Existence of God in the Context of the Debate around Stoic Theology in the Roman Period (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Tyler A. Stewart, Marquette University
Theological Suicide: Evil and the Imperception of God (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Discussion (20 min)

S20 -345 Philo of Alexandria
11/20/2016 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: 304B (3rd Level) – Convention Center (CC)

Theme: Reincarnation and Afterlife in Philo and His World

Torrey Seland, prof. em., VID-School of Mission and Theology, Norway, Presiding

Sami Yli-Karjanmaa, University of Helsinki
Philo’s Position on Reincarnation (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

David Runia, University of Melbourne
Does Philo Accept the Doctrine of Reincarnation? (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Break (10 min)

Rainer Hirsch-Luipold, Universität Bern – Université de Berne
Afterlife and Reincarnation in Plutarch (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Jeffrey Trumbower, Saint Michael’s College (Vermont)
Closing the Door on Reincarnation in Early Christianity: Limiting the Options (30 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Discussion (20 min)

S21-144b  Philo of Alexandria
11/21/2016 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Room: 008A (River Level) – Convention Center (CC)

Theme: Philo’s de Mutatione Nominum

Scott Mackie, Independent Scholar, Presiding

Michael Cover, Marquette University
Philo’s De mutatione nominum: Sample Commentary, Exegetical Structure, and Its Place in the “Abrahamic Cycle” of the Allegorical Commentary (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Gregory Sterling, Yale Divinity School
What’s in a Name? The Place of De mutatione nominum in Philo’s Allegorical Commentary (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Discussion (20 min)

Break (10 min)

James Royse, Claremont, California
The Text of Philo’s De mutatione nominum (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Frederick Brenk, Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome
A Name by Any Name? The Allegorizing Etymologies of Philo and Plutarch (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Michel Barnes, Marquette University
Divine Powers in De mutatione nominum and Patristic Reception (20 min)

Click here for Abstract!                           Click for Manuscript + Appendices. (two files!)

Discussion (20 min)

Business Meeting (15 min)

 

 


 SBL Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 21-24, 2015.

Downloading papers may not work well on Ipad, but OK on laptop/PC.

(For the 2013 and 2014 Philo papers, see  further below.)


S 22-237  Philo of Alexandria

Sunday 11/22/2015 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: Room TBD – Hotel TBD

Theme: Philo & the History of Interpretation

Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Presiding

Nelida Naveros Cordova, CDP, Loyola University of Chicago
The Greek Philosophical Tradition in Philo’s Ethical Teaching: Eusebeia for the Service of God and Human Beings (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Frank Shaw, Ashland University
An Onomastic History: What Can Philo Provide? (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Michael Francis, University of Notre Dame
Voluntary and Involuntary Sin and the Allegory of the Soul in Philo (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Ludovica De Luca, Università degli studi Roma Tre
The bronze snake according to Philo of Alexandria in Legum allegoriae II, 79-81 (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Justin M. Rogers, Freed-Hardeman University
The Reception of Philonic Arithmological Exegesis in Didymus the Blind’s Commentary on Genesis (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Discussion (15 min)

 

S23 – 136 Philo of Alexandria

Monday 11/23/2015. 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Room TBD – Hotel TBD

Theme: Historical and Intellectual Traditions in Philo
Ellen Birnbaum, Presiding

Miriam Ben Zeev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Philo as Historian: His Testimony on the Beginning of the Jewish Settlement at Rome as a Case Study (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Michael Pope, Brigham Young University
Opportunistic Stoicism: Philo’s Quod Omnis Probus Liber Sit and Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations Book 2 (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Courtney Friesen, University of Oxford
Dying Like a Woman: Philo on the Tragic Death of Polyxena (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Angela Standhartinger, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany
Philo in ethnographic discourse. Some observations to the literary context of De Vita Contemplativa> (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript

Joan E. Taylor, King’s College – London
The Women Therapeutae and the Divided Space of the ‘Synagogue’ (25 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                            Click here for Manuscript.

Discussion (15 min)

 

S23-341 Philo of Alexandria

Monday 11/23/2015. 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Room TBD – Hotel TBD

Theme: Philo’s De Plantatione

Thomas Tobin, Loyola University of Chicago, Presiding

Albert C. Geljon, Christelijk Gymnasium Utrecht
Sample translation and commentary on Philo De Plantatione (10 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                                  Click here for Manuscript

Maren Niehoff, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Writing a Commentary on a Philonic Allegorical Treatise (20 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                                  Click here for Manuscript

David Runia, Queen’s College University of Melbourne
The place of the treatise De plantatione in Philo’s Allegorical Commentary (20 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                                  Click here for Manuscript

Discussion (20 min)

Break (10 min)

James R. Royse, Claremont, California
The Text of Philo’s De plantatione (20 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                                  Click here for Manuscript.

Sami Yli-Karjanmaa, University of Helsinki
Plant. 1–27: The Significance of Reading Philonic Parallels (20 min)
Click here for Abstract!                                                  Click here for Manuscript

Discussion (20 min)

Business Meeting (10 min)

 

 

 

 SBL Annual Meeting, San Diego Nov. 22-25, 2014.


S23-237 Philo of Alexandria
11/23/2014 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM
Room: Room 1 B (Upper level) – San Diego Convention Center (CC)
Theme: Philo’s Legal Exegesis
Ellen Birnbaum, Cambridge, Mass., Presiding

Maren R. Niehoff, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Philo’s Rationalisation of the Jewish Law in Greco-Roman Context (25 min).
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript 

Yedidya Etzion, University of California-Berkeley
Philo’s Sabbath: A study in Philo’s Jewish Law (25 min)
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the manuscript

Daniel R. Streett, Durham University
Philo’s Exegesis of the Biblical Festival Laws: Arithmology, Askesis, and Imitatio Dei (25 min).
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript

Break (15 min)

Michael Francis, University of Notre Dame
Wasted Seed and Sins of Intent: Sexual Ethics in Spec. 3.34-36 in the Case of Infertile Marriage (25 min).
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript

Horacio Vela, University of Notre Dame
A New Command: Philo as Lawgiver and Interpreter in the Case of the Egyptian Blasphemer (25 min)
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript

Discussion (10 min)

S25-130 Philo of Alexandria

11/25/2014 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Room: Room 33 C (Upper level) – San Diego Convention Center (CC)
Theme: Philo’s De Decalogo
Ronald Cox, Pepperdine University, Presiding

Sarah Judith Pearce, University of Southampton
Philo of Alexandria on the second commandment (15 min).
Updated Abstract  ……………….. Click here for Manuscript

Note: Please download Pearce’s translation of De Decalogo 66-81 here.

Hindy Najman, Yale University
Response to Sarah Pearce (15 min)
Discussion (30 min)

Break (15 min)

James R. Royse, Claremont, CA
The Text of Philo’s De Decalogo (15 min).
Abstract  ………………..Click here for the Manuscript

Abraham Terian, National Academy of Sciences / Armenia
The Armenian Textual and Interpretive Traditions of Philo’s De Decalogo (15 min)
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript

Manuel Alexandre Jr., Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Rhetorical Texture and Pattern in Philo of Alexandria’s De Decalogo (15 min)
Abstract  ……………….. Click here for the Manuscript

Discussion (30 min)
Business Meeting (15 min)

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SBL Annual Meeting, Baltimore Nov 22-26 2013.

S24-334 Philo of Alexandria 11/24/2013 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM Room: 321 – Convention Center

Theme: Philo’s Sources, Session One
Thomas Tobin, Loyola University of Chicago, Presiding

Michael B. Cover, University of Notre Dame:
The Sun and the Chariot: The Respublica and the Phaedrus as Rival Platonic Model
of Psychic Vision and Transformation in Philo
Abstract……………….. Manuscript

David Runia, University of Melbourne:
Philo and Placita
Abstract .……………….Manuscript

Carlos Lévy , Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV):
About Some Concepts of Philonian Epistemology
Abstract ………………..Manuscript

Jutta Leonhardt-Balzer, University of Aberdeen:
Philo’s Sources for His Arithmology in the Quaestiones
Abstract……………….. Manuscript

S25-137 Philo of Alexandria 11/25/2013 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM Room: 349 – Convention Center

Theme: Philo’s Sources, Session Two
Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Presiding

David Lincicum, University of Oxford:
Philo’s Library: The Scope and Shape of Philo’s Indebtedness to Non-Biblical Texts
Abstract……………….. Manuscript

Pura Nieto Hernández, Brown University:
Philo of Alexandria, Reader of Homer and the Archaic Poets
Abstract ………………..Manuscript

Gregory E. Sterling, Yale Divinity School:
From the Thick Marshes of the Nile to the Throne of God: Moses in Ezekiel and Philo
Abstract  ……………….. Manuscript

Francis Borchardt, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Hong Kong:
Philo’s Use of Aristeas and the Question of Authority
Abstract  ……………….. Manuscript

.